Sunday, November 6, 2011

What People are Saying

When soldiers go off to war, they leave behind family and friends who are fearful for their safety. Kurt Hartley, Operation Iraqi Freedom veteran and now Baptist minister, says, “I can still remember the anxiety and fear that rushed through our family during my deployment.” Those left behind have their own battles to fight after those gut-wrenching goodbyes, but where do they go for help? Edie Melson’s newest book, Fighting Fear: Winning the War at Home When Your Soldier Leaves for Battle, addresses these concerns. This devotional is not just for military families, but also for anyone who knows a soldier or veteran. “As a combat veteran and now minister,” Hartley says, “I was captivated by the premise of this book.”

Author Edie Melson says, “I remember our son’s first deployment, especially what it was like to say goodbye to my oldest son as he left for Iraq. Throughout the last couple of days, I couldn’t help but wonder, “Was this the last time I’d eat supper with him? The last picture I’d have of him? The last time I’d ever see him smile?”

Melson has collected encouraging stories from people who have sent loved ones off to war, from WWII to the current Afghanistan conflict. They share their stories of how they’ve dealt with the fear. Interspersed are devotions written by Melson that strengthen and enlighten the reader. She begins by sharing what it was like watching her son get ready for his first deployment and compares that to putting on the full armor of God. Cecil Stokes, award winning producer says, "Sometimes I forgot if Melson was talking about the physical war we are fighting or the spiritual one. This book folds between the two effortlessly." Jeff Strueker, a Black Hawk Down veteran says, "Melson give readers a rare glimpse into the raw intense emotions that military families go through when warriors are away serving our nation"

Hartley says, “Many days, I prayed that the Spirit would comfort my wife, children, mother, and friends, as I walked ‘through the valley of the shadow of death.’ I was confident in my training, but never found the right truth from God’s Word to comfort those who were praying for me...Until now. Fighting Fear: Winning the War at Home is just the kind of tool that the Spirit can use to comfort those who are batting to stay strong during their own time of adversity.”

Deborah Raney, author of the Hanover Falls novels and A Vow to Cherish, says, “This book...helped me understand the emotions my brother and sister-in-law were experiencing when my Marine nephew left for Iraq. What a great resource this book would have been for all of our extended family.”

As former missionary to Russia and award-winning writer Susan May Warren says, “The essential weapon of faith for the families of soldiers fighting the war at home. Edie Melson writes with the compassion, depth and poignancy to make this devotional a fixture on the bedside stand of anyone whose loved one is deployed. Deeply touching, empowering and healing, it guides readers to the Hand that will hold and strengthen them during this challenging season.”

Fighting Fear: Winning the War at Home will be released by Lighthouse Publishing of the Carolinas on Veterans Day, Friday, November 11, 2011. It will be available through Amazon and Barnes and Noble online, as well as in local books stores.

Edie and her publisher are also excited to announce that a portion of the proceeds from every book sold will be donated to the troops, through Blue Star Mothers of America.

Saturday, October 1, 2011

Book Launch Buildup

Scheduled book launch date:
Veterans Day, 2011
11-11-11
Fighting Fear: Winning the War at Home
When Your Soldier Leaves for Battle

Here's what those who've read it are saying:


As a combat veteran and now minister, I was captivated by the premise of this book. I can still remember the anxiety and fear that rushed through our family during my deployment. Many days, I prayed that the Spirit would comfort my wife, children mother and friends as I walked "through the valley of the shadow of death. I was confident in my training, but never found the right truth from God's Word to comfort those who were praying for me...UNTIL NOW! Fighting Fear: Winning the War at Home is just the kind of tool that the Spirit can use to comfort those who are battling to stay strong during their own time of adversity.
 - Kurt Hartley, Operation Iraqi Freedom Veteran and Ordained Southern Baptist Minister


This book will be a real blessing to anyone with a deployed spouse or child, but it also helped me understand the emotions my brother and sister-in-law were experiencing when my Marine nephew left for Iraq. What a great resource this book would have been for all of our extended family then. It is one you'll want to purchase by the dozen to keep on hand for gift-giving to anyone who loves a soldier.
 - Deborah Raney, author of the Hanover Falls novels and A Vow to Cherish


The essential weapon of faith for the families of soldiers fighting the war at home. Edie Melson writes with the compassion, depth and poignancy to make this devotional a fixture on the bedside stand of anyone whose loved one is deployed. Deeply touching, empowering and healing, it guides readers to the Hand that will hold and strengthen them during this challenging season.
 - Susan May Warren, award-winning, best-selling novelist and former missionary to Russia

Sunday, July 17, 2011

War Stories, A Mother’s Perspective

Deployment
by Edie Melson

Fighting Fear, Winning the War at Home
I remember our son's first deployment, especially what it was like to say goodbye to my oldest son as he left for Iraq. Throughout the last couple days, I couldn’t help but wonder, “Was that the last time I’d eat supper with him?  The last picture I’ll have of him?  The last time I’ll ever see him smile?”

As a military mom I’ve learned it’s important not to dwell on the ‘what ifs.’  But at the beginning of this deployment my heart was aching and harder to control.  Almost of its own volition my mind seems to drift to the endless possibilities with a son in the Middle East.  I wondered what the next seven months would bring.  When would I hear from him?  What was he doing?  And most importantly—was he safe?

I’ve learned many coping techniques in the two and a half years he has served in the Marine Corps.  My prayer life is vibrant and active and my reliance on God is whole.  I’ve learned that the belief I would always be able to protect my children is false.  My son is entirely in God’s hands and always has been.  And I have reluctantly come to acknowledge that is the best place for him. 

While he was on deployment I learned to avoid the major TV networks and newspapers that report the worst of news from all angles and tried to tell me my son was risking his life for nothing. When I heard of protests at local military bases my heart went out to the men and women stationed there.  I know firsthand the hurt and frustration these soldiers feel. They're not the ones who choose the conflicts they’re involved in.  Even as I understood the public’s dissatisfaction with the political situation around us, I wished they'd take it out on those in Washington. 

I stayed in close touch with other military families, because they understood my circumstances.  I found that, in general, military moms aren’t political people and we can’t understand those who are.  For us the war is personal, not a topic to be debated. It’s about our children’s sacrifices; their willingness to put their lives on the line for something they believe in, something we all used to believe in – God and country.  I’m proud of my son, but I’m afraid also.  I realized that was something he'd chosen to do, something he felt he had to do. I just wish he could've served in a way that wasn't so dangerous.  But that choice too, was out of my hands.

As I said goodbye to the strong man my son had become, I remembered the selfish teenager who once thought the world revolved around him. Now he loved his fellow Marines in a way most couldn't imagine.  He put their well-being far above his own and his former narcissism had faded. His life was now one of selflessness and sacrifice.  At the same time he learned to fight and carry a gun, he learned to love his fellow man in a way that few experience. 

So where did I go from there? I continued to hope, and I continued to pray—for a homecoming filled with joy.